Training and pruning deciduous fruit trees in the home garden

Training and pruning deciduous fruit trees in the home garden



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Proper pruning enhances the beauty of almost any landscape tree and shrub, while improper pruning can ruin or greatly reduce its landscape potential. In most cases, it is better not to prune than to do it incorrectly. In nature, plants go years with little or no pruning, but man can ruin what nature has created. By using improper pruning methods healthy plants are often weakened or deformed.

Content:
  • Pruning deciduous fruit trees and roses
  • Plant pruning for beginners
  • Fruit Tree Pruning - Basic Principles
  • Master Gardeners: It rained. Now's the time for winter gardening
  • Three ways to train a fruit tree
  • Pruning, training key to healthy fruit trees
  • Why you need two sets of shears in the garden
  • Pruning Tree Fruit – The Basics
  • Pruning and Training Fruit Trees in the Home Landscape
WATCH RELATED VIDEO: The Garden Gurus - Deciduous Fruit Tree Pruning

Pruning deciduous fruit trees and roses

Can I tell you that we all have room for fruit trees and through this workshop, I will demonstrate just that, I will show you how you can fit them in at your place.

We all should be planting more trees, to be honest to help our climate out. As this is a very big topic I will briefly cover enough areas to have you well on your way to growing and managing your own productive and healthy fruit trees.

There are a number of ways in which you will obtain your fruit trees and most will buy them from a Plant Nursery or Werribee Heritage Park Orchard, so you need to look at the aspect of where you are going to plant your new fruit tree. Most fruit trees are grafted so that they remain true to type. Aspect-Space: You need to know a few things before you go off on the hunt for your fruit trees! You need to know if the spot you have set aside for it faces North, South, East or West?

You also need to know how big the tree grows to ensure that you have the appropriate space for it to grow. You will find that as we live in a temperate climate here in the Melbourne Suburbs we are very lucky to have the selection of a vast array of varieties that can grow in our climate. Tree Selection: When choosing particularly deciduous trees you are best to buy them in their dormancy in winter without leaves and soil around the roots. The graft should look like a smooth union of the two timbers and be entire.

Next look at the shape of the tree, does it look uniform, is it going to be able to be pruned into the shape you are looking for? Is the tree labeled? Sometimes you can buy a double or triple grafted tree that has the pollinator grafted onto it, so look out for those. A good dose of soil conditioner like Seasol or Worm Wee watered down about ratio should be watered in after planting.

When planting a young fruit tree especially a deciduous tree inspection of the roots is needed and secateurs used to sharpen up and breaks or bad cuts so that they heal properly when planted.

The branches also need to be pruned back around about by a third and of course in keeping with the style or shape you have decided to produce. The young tree needs to be staked so that the graft and the rootstock get a good hold on the ground. It is best to use three stakes in a triangular fashion so as to hold the tree in the centre of the stakes it will also keep humans with lawn mowers and wheelbarrows away from the graft until it is a couple of years old.

Care must also be taken to ensure that grass and or weeds do not grow up to the trunk of the tree as this will cause it to become more susceptible to rots mildews and other moisture related diseases.

Soil and Mulching: You need to know a little about the soil in the space you have set aside for your tree. Is it clay soil? You can always alter your soil by adding to it, like leaf matter, well-rotted compost, straw, mulch, and the list is endless but please resist the temptation to export your clay out and import lots of soil in, you will do yourself an in justice. Make the soil what you need it to be for the type of tree your going to plant, there.

Generally, good well-drained well-composted soil is ideal and a slight mound to the base of the tree so that you ensure good drainage. Make sure when you plant your tree that the same level of where the soil was is consistent in your garden about mm from the graft that is about the soil level. If you bury the graft you will kill the fruit tree.Pruning — Shaping: Deciduous fruit trees require pruning and shaping to maximise fruit production, if you want to ensure a good size crop and keep healthy trees.

Most people think that it is late winter that they are pruned but in fact in Summer as well after fruit has been picked the trees also need to be pruned. If you are growing espaliers the tress are pruned more often. Some fruit trees like Peaches and Nectarines should be pruned to produce one-year-old timber as this is the wood that produces fruit.

Apples and pears, on the other hand, need to be pruned to encourage fruit spurs for this is where the fruit is produced and the age of the timber is not important.

There are many types of pruning shapes you can choose but the one that is most used in backyard situations is the open vase shape if the tree is going to be grown in a lawn area or as a feature tree. Some examples of an open vase.

As you can see by the examples above the tree is pruned so that it maximises the amount of sun and air circulation, hence better fruit production and ripening. Other shapes can be adopted some will choose central leader where there is very little pruning done at all however this is the least productive and I would discourage it, the one I believe that best lends itself to the backyard is the espalier tree.

Espalier is the horticultural and ancient agricultural practice of controlling woody plant growth originally for the production of fruit,by pruning and tying branches to a frame so that they grow into a flat plane, frequently in formal patterns, against a structure such as a wall, fence, or trellis, and also plants which have been shaped in this way.

Espalier, trained into flat two-dimensional forms, are ideal not only for decorative purposes, but also for gardens in which space is limited. In a temperate climate, they may be planted next to a wall that can reflect more sunlight and retain heat overnight or planted so that they absorb maximum sunlight by training them parallel to the equator.

These two facts allow the season to beextended so that fruit matures over a longer period. A restricted form of training consists of a central stem and a number of paired horizontal branches all trained in the same plane. The most important advantage is that of being able to increase the growth of a branch by training it vertically.

Later, one can decrease growth while increasing fruit production by training it horizontally. There are many different forms of espalier to suit nearly any or every space around the perimeter of ones garden. So as you can see they really can fit well in our backyards against walls and fences, give some thought to how easy it is to net these trees, and the amount of fruit you get from them is incredible as most fruit trees produce fruit on lateral growth and that is something that these trees encourage.

Pruning is easy as you already know that to keep these two dimensional anything that protrudes to the front or the rear must be removed.

The other thing with this type of pruning method is that it gets done throughout the year not just twice once in July, and once in summer, I personally have all of my fruit trees like this and would never go back to any other shapes. I will go through a couple of the most common pests and diseases and their remedies but for the rest I suggest you either take an affected leaf fruit or branch what ever is affected and show it to someone like myself whom is qualified to diagnose and recommend a solution for you, your local Nurseryman would be a good start.

If you intend to stick with organics ensure you tell them that so that their recommendations are in line with your practices. As I have a bee hive I do not spray anything so I use companion planting extensively and use natural remedies always. Curly Leaf on Nectarines and Peaches. This is a soil born disease and can be kept to a minimum as there really is no cure by doing a few things and they as follows;.

Codling moth : Codling moth on apples can be kept away by planting garlic at the base of your trees as the emerging nymph of the moth comes from eggs laid in the soil and then hatches and makes its way up your tree and into your apples, if Garlic is planted the nymph does not like the smell and the chemical that it give off and goes elsewhere.

The Orchard is situated behind the Mansion down in the farm precinct of the property, down on the river flats. The Orchard is open every day and entry is free. The Orchard has lots of old trees from the original Orchard and lots of new trees that are Heritage trees, these are the fruit that Supermarkets wont stock because of one or another reason, and for the most part these apples are far tastier than what it commercially available today.We are always looking for Volunteers and that is a great way to work beside others that will teach you how to look after your trees, membership is free, also subscribe to our newsletter and get the up to date information about the Orchard and when are grafting and budding days are open again for you to come and purchase a heritage tree or learn how to graft.

We have grafting days in July where you can buy freshly grafted trees and get advice or learn how to graft, come and taste some of our heritage apples on the day. Urban Quail Keeping. Healthy Happy Backyard Chooks. Making Italian preserves. Keeping Fruit Trees. Healthy Fruit Trees. Growing Veggies from Seed Successfully. Seed Saving. Balcony Gardening. Creating a food forest. Getting Started Growing Veggies.

Design an Edible Garden. Vegie gardening for beginners. The Art of Preserving. Know Thy Soils. Growing Vegies in Winter. The No Dig Garden. Permaculture in Pots. Preserving Basics. Intro to Organic Gardening. Seasonal Vegie Growing Guide. Home grown berries — Gooseberries. Growing in pots for small gardens renters and apartment balconies. Home grown berries — Red and White Currants. Grafting and Pruning Fruit Trees. Home grown berries — Raspberries.

Home grown berries — Jostaberries. Citrus in the home garden. Home grown berries — Blackcurrants. Home grown brambles. Perennial plants. Wild Greens. Shelter Appropriate cover to protect your plants from the elements. Click Here. Water Be water wise! Learn about ways to be a water warrior. Habitat Birds and the bees. How do you make sure they have a happy home? Waste Your waste is another worm's treasure. Do you want to take better care of your fruit trees? Learn about many of the aspects of caring for fruit trees here, such as choosing trees to suit your garden, feeding and pruning.

Some examples of an open vase Side elevation of open vase shape Over head shot of open vase shape As you can see by the examples above the tree is pruned so that it maximises the amount of sun and air circulation, hence better fruit production and ripening.


Plant pruning for beginners

Peaches have been grown in Asia for more than two thousand years, and produced for centuries in the United States. Nectarines can be used in the same way as peaches, and may be considered as substitutes for peaches. Genetically, the only difference between peaches and nectarines is the lack of fuzz on the nectarine skin. Usually, nectarines are smaller than peaches, have more red color on the surface and more aroma. Popular uses for peaches and nectarines include fresh eating, sugared and with cream.

Author(s): Ingels, Chuck; Geisel, Pamela M; Unruh, Carolyn L | Abstract: How to prune fruit and nut trees for optimum health and productivity.

Fruit Tree Pruning - Basic Principles

By planting trained trees in shapes such as espaliers, cordons and fans, you can fit apples, pears and more into the smallest of gardens. Either growing flat against a wall or fence, or as a garden divider or screen , trained fruit trees make an attractive feature. Despite being deciduous, they look good all year round, offering blossom in spring, delicious fruits and attractive foliage from summer to autumn, and dramatic shapes through the winter. Discover more beautiful trees for small gardens. Trained trees can provide you with a surprisingly large crop in a small space and as the fruit should be in easy reach, you can pick it before it falls. You can buy trees ready-trained, mainly from specialist fruit nurseries, or train them yourself from scratch. This is a single stem with short fruiting spurs evenly spaced along it. Once it has reached the top wire, prune the leading shoot back to a leaf joint at the required height. Many fruits can be grown this way, including apples , cherries , plums and damsons. Prune the arms like cordons.

Master Gardeners: It rained. Now's the time for winter gardening

Can I tell you that we all have room for fruit trees and through this workshop, I will demonstrate just that, I will show you how you can fit them in at your place. We all should be planting more trees, to be honest to help our climate out. As this is a very big topic I will briefly cover enough areas to have you well on your way to growing and managing your own productive and healthy fruit trees. There are a number of ways in which you will obtain your fruit trees and most will buy them from a Plant Nursery or Werribee Heritage Park Orchard, so you need to look at the aspect of where you are going to plant your new fruit tree. Most fruit trees are grafted so that they remain true to type.

Families today have less space for fruit trees, less time to take care of them, and less time to process or preserve large crops than in the past.

Three ways to train a fruit tree

This is the time to order seeds from catalogs for the best selection.For seed that is locally grown and adapted to our climate, check out the display of Redwood Organic Seeds at Wyntour Nursery and Holiday Markets. Get ready to start tomato and pepper seeds indoors around mid-February and other warm weather vegetable seeds in March. This is the time of year to plant new trees and shrubs. Go bare root if you can. I hear the roses are in at Wyntour Gardens and most nurseries will have bare root trees, and shrubs available soon after the first of the year.

Pruning, training key to healthy fruit trees

JavaScript seems to be disabled in your browser. You must have JavaScript enabled in your browser to utilize the functionality of this website. Updated: October 25,Pruning and training are two different aspects of modifying naturally occurring growth patterns. Training involves tree development and form, whereas pruning involves tree function and size. Pruning and training are horticultural manipulations done to modify naturally occurring growth patterns within plants.

1) is most commonly used on almond, apri- cot, cherry, fig, nectarine, peach, plum, and prune trees. Many pear, apple, and pistachio trees are also trained.

Why you need two sets of shears in the garden

The timing of pruning is part of the success as well as making the right cuts. In Whanganui, roses and deciduous fruit trees such as apples and pears are best pruned in July. Any earlier and in our temperate climate we risk getting a warm snap that makes the plant think it is spring. The plant can then produce some new growth which risks getting walloped with a July frost.

Pruning Tree Fruit – The Basics

RELATED VIDEO: How to Prune Fruit Trees: Avocado, Apple, Nectarine, Plum, Pomegranate, Pear, Cherry, Fig

Avoid topping trees. Removing large branches leaves stubs that can cause several health problems. It also destroys the plant's natural shape and promotes suckering and the development of weak branch structures. Appearance in the landscape is essential to a plant's usefulness. For most landscapes, a plant's natural form is best.

The best training and pruning system depends upon the tree type speciesand cultivar.

Pruning and Training Fruit Trees in the Home Landscape

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The objective of Backyard Orchard Culture is a prolonged harvest of tree-ripe fruit from a small space in the yard. This is accomplished by planting an assortment of fruit trees close together and keeping them small by summer pruning. For years, most of the information about growing fruit came from commercial orchard culture: methods that promoted maximum size for maximum yield but required foot ladders for pruning, thinning and picking, and to square feet of land per tree.